Lotus Pose–The Most Optional Yoga Pose

A lot of debate surrounds Lotus pose, which is also known as Padmasana. My yoga mentor doesn’t teach it in class at all because of the stress that it can place on the hip, knee, and ankle joints. Others swear that if done correctly, it can be the pretzel pose to untie your knots.

In weighing the possible benefits versus the possible injuries, it’s a draw. Personally, I don’t have enough information to form an opinion either way. That’s why I’ve decided to include instruction for Lotus pose.

As with all exercises, if you feel pain, stop immediately. Tightness is something you can work through. Discomfort can release. Pain will mess you up, so don’t ever continue doing an exercise if you feel pain.

Half Lotus Pose

Before you go all full committal on Lotus pose, let’s take a moment to prepare with Half Lotus pose. This is a great way for you to test the waters and see how your body will react to Lotus pose without actually getting yourself all tied up like a pretzel. Pay particular attention to how your hips, knees, and ankles feel.

You should practice Siddhasana to help prepare for Half Lotus pose.

  1. half lotus poseTake a seat on the mat.
  2. If you notice that your knees are higher than your hips, grab a bolster or folded blanket to sit upon. Lifting your hips reduces the stress they will feel from this pose.
  3. Bend your left leg, bringing the left heel toward your crotch. Make sure that your left knee is out to the side and your hip joint feels open and relaxed.
  4. Ground down, and feel your SITs bones press into the surface beneath you.
  5.  Rotate your right hip open, and guide your right foot onto your left thigh. Place your foot so that the sole is facing up.
  6. Hold here and breathe.
  7. Switch sides.

As you’re holding and breathing, make sure to root down through your SITs bones. When you root down into the ground, you also send energy up through the top of your head. By keeping this up and down energy going, you will feel less stress in your hips.

Lotus Pose

I highly recommend that before you practice Lotus pose, you practice Siddhasana and/or half Lotus pose. Siddhasana helps open your hips appropriately so that you’ll place minimal (or at least, reduced) strain on your knees and hips. Half Lotus pose helps get your ankles warmed up for the full pose.

  1. lotus poseTake a seat on the mat.
  2. If you notice that your knees are higher than your hips, grab a bolster or folded blanket to sit upon. Lifting your hips reduces the stress they will feel from this pose.
  3. Bend your left leg, bringing the left heel toward your crotch. Make sure that your left knee is out to the side and your hip joint feels open and relaxed.
  4. Ground down, and feel your SITs bones press into the surface beneath you.
  5.  Rotate your right hip open, and guide your right foot onto your left thigh. Place your foot so that the sole is facing up.
  6. Keep your left thigh stable, but allow your left shin to slide out from under your right leg.
  7. Use your hands to help guide your left foot onto your right thigh.
  8. With the soles of both feet facing up, root down through your SITs bones. Feel how the rotation necessary for this pose comes from the hips.

Lotus Pose Video

Here is a video for visual learners. Remember, if at any time you feel pain, stop. It’s true for many things in life but especially true when you’re practicing Lotus pose.

Do you think of something special to help you settle into Lotus pose? Let us know in the comments below.

Thank you for reading this article. If you enjoy the information supplied, please consider supporting this website!

Sign up for my newsletter to get more tips for health and happiness! Also, you can find me on FacebookYouTube and Pinterest as Custom Pilates and Yoga.

Sharing is caring!

About Sarah Stockett

Hi! I'm Sarah, and I'm a certified Pilates and yoga instructor with a passion for pain relief. When I'm not working with clients, I'm researching the best ways to get rid of pain. Do you want to learn how to practice yoga and Pilates safely in your own home? Or, do you want to know all my tips and tricks for pain relief? Join my mailing list and receive free goodies to help you.

shares